PhD student in IS, Masters in DH, research in IR and crowdsourcing.
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In this week’s “Drone Sunday” post from From...

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In this week’s “Drone Sunday” post from From Where I Drone, a caravan of camels is herded across the Australian Outback, casting shadows on the barren terrain. Between 1870 and 1920, roughly 20,000 camels were brought to Australia from India, Afghanistan, and the Arabian Peninsula. Today, the country’s feral camel population is between 1 and 1.2 million, and is considered a nuisance to Outback communities. For more awesome drone imagery, follow From Where I Drone!

Instagram: https://bit.ly/2OrdEdS

26°47'56.9"S, 137°44'02.3"E

Source imagery: Jarrad Seng Photography

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POrg
15 days ago
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Champaign, Illinois
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The Last Conversation You’ll Ever Need to Have About Eating Right

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Mark Bittman and Dr. David L. Katz patiently answer pretty much every question we could think of about healthy food.

#

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POrg
130 days ago
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Champaign, Illinois
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Check out this stunning shot of the rice terraces in Mù Cang...

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Check out this stunning shot of the rice terraces in Mù Cang Chải, Vietnam. Developed by the Hmong people, the purposeful leveling of the land makes it possible to retain water at each step and enables the growth of rice on steep hillsides. Additionally, bamboo is cut in half and used for a controlled transfer of water from step to step.

Instagram: http://bit.ly/2FLiRN4

21.833°N 104.167°E

Photograph by Merve Çevik

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POrg
142 days ago
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Champaign, Illinois
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Older Japanese women are shoplifting to find community and meaning in jail

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Shiho Fukada

Shiho Fukada

In Japan, where 27.3% of the population is 65 or older, elderly women are committing petty crimes like shoplifting in order to go to jail to find care and community that is increasingly denied them elsewhere. Japan’s jails are becoming nursing homes.

Why have so many otherwise law-abiding elderly women resorted to petty theft? Caring for Japanese seniors once fell to families and communities, but that’s changing. From 1980 to 2015, the number of seniors living alone increased more than sixfold, to almost 6 million. And a 2017 survey by Tokyo’s government found that more than half of seniors caught shoplifting live alone; 40 percent either don’t have family or rarely speak with relatives. These people often say they have no one to turn to when they need help.

Even women with a place to go describe feeling invisible. “They may have a house. They may have a family. But that doesn’t mean they have a place they feel at home,” says Yumi Muranaka, head warden of Iwakuni Women’s Prison, 30 miles outside Hiroshima. “They feel they are not understood. They feel they are only recognized as someone who gets the house chores done.”

All photos by Shiho Fukada. The first photo is of Mrs. F, aged 89, who stole “rice, strawberries, cold medicine”. She says: “I was living alone on welfare. I used to live with my daughter’s family and used all my savings taking care of an abusive and violent son-in-law.” The woman in the second photo recounts:

The first time I shoplifted was about 13 years ago. I wandered into a bookstore in town and stole a paperback novel. I was caught, taken to a police station, and questioned by the sweetest police officer. He was so kind. He listened to everything I wanted to say. I felt I was being heard for the first time in my life. In the end, he gently tapped on my shoulder and said, ‘I understand you were lonely, but don’t do this again.’

I can’t tell you how much I enjoy working in the prison factory. The other day, when I was complimented on how efficient and meticulous I was, I grasped the joy of working. I regret that I never worked. My life would have been different.

I enjoy my life in prison more. There are always people around, and I don’t feel lonely here. When I got out the second time, I promised that I wouldn’t go back. But when I was out, I couldn’t help feeling nostalgic.

Tags: crime   Japan   photography   Shiho Fukada
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POrg
142 days ago
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JimB
141 days ago
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How sad

A wishlist of scientific breakthroughs by Robert Boyle

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Robert Boyle List

17th-century scientist Robert Boyle, one of the world’s first chemists and creator of Boyle’s Law, wrote out a list of problems he hoped could be solved through science. Since the list was written more than 300 years ago, almost everything on it has been discovered, invented, or otherwise figured out in some fashion. Here are several of the items from Boyle’s list (in bold) and the corresponding scientific advances that have followed:

The Prolongation of Life. English life expectancy in the 17th century was only 35 years or so (due mainly to infant and child mortality). The world average in 2014 was 71.5 years.

The Art of Flying. The Wright Brothers conducted their first flight in 1903 and now air travel is as routine as riding in a horse-drawn carriage in Boyle’s time.

The Art of Continuing long under water, and exercising functions freely there. Scuba gear was in use by the end of the 19th century and some contemporary divers have remained underwater for more than two days.

The Cure of Diseases at a distance or at least by Transplantation. Not quite sure exactly what Boyle meant by this, but human organ transplants started happening around the turn of the 20th century. X-rays, MRI machines, and ultrasound all peer inside the body for disease from a distance. Also, doctors are now able to diagnose many conditions via video chat.

The Attaining Gigantick Dimensions. I’m assuming Boyle meant humans somehow transforming themselves into 20-foot-tall giants and not the obesity that has come with our relative affluence and availability of cheap food. Still, the average human is taller by 4 inches than 150 years ago because of improved nutrition. Factory-farmed chickens have quadrupled in size since the 1950s. And if Boyle paid a visit to the Burj Khalifa or the Mall of America, he would surely agree they are Gigantick.

The Acceleration of the Production of things out of Seed. To use just one example out of probably thousands, some varieties of tomato take just 50 days from planting to harvest. See also selective breeding, GMOs, hydroponics, greenhouses, etc. (P.S. in Boyle’s time, tomatoes were suspected to be poisonous.)

The makeing of Glass Malleable. Transparent plastics were first developed in the 19th century and perfected in the 20th century.

The making of Parabolicall and Hyperbolicall Glasses. The first high quality non-spherical lenses were made during Boyle’s lifetime, but all he’d need is a quick peek at a pair of Warby Parkers to see how much the technology has advanced since then, to say nothing of the mirrors on the Giant Magellan Telescope.

The making Armor light and extremely hard. Bulletproof armor was known in Boyle’s time, but the introduction of Kevlar vests in the 1970s made them truly light and strong.

The practicable and certain way of finding Longitudes. When pushed to its limits, GPS is accurate in determining your location on Earth to within 11 millimeters.

Potent Druggs to alter or Exalt Imagination, Waking, Memory, and other functions, and appease pain, procure innocent sleep, harmless dreams, etc. Dude, we have so many Potent Druggs now, it’s not even funny. According to a 2016 report, the global pharmaceutical market will reach $1.12 trillion.

A perpetuall Light. It’s not exactly perpetual, but the electric lightbulb was invented in the 19th century and the longest-lasting bulb has been working least 116 years.

Varnishes perfumable by Rubbing. Scratch and sniff was invented by 3M in 1965.

(via bb)

Tags: lists   Robert Boyle   science
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POrg
212 days ago
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Champaign, Illinois
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Seven Years

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[hair in face] "SEVVVENNN YEEEARRRSSS"
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POrg
240 days ago
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Champaign, Illinois
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9 public comments
chrisrosa
244 days ago
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😢
San Francisco, CA
rjstegbauer
245 days ago
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Touching and beautiful! One of your best.
alt_text_bot
246 days ago
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[hair in face] "SEVVVENNN YEEEARRRSSS"
ameel
246 days ago
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<3
Melbourne, Australia
MaryEllenCG
246 days ago
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::sniffle::
Greater Bostonia
kyleniemeyer
246 days ago
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😭
Corvallis, OR
louloupix
246 days ago
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That's why I still watch it..Time to time they deliver...
Celine17
236 days ago
j'ai toujours autant de mal à comprendre la trame...
marcrichter
246 days ago
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Awesome. I'm speechless.
tbd
deezil
246 days ago
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OKAY I'M CRYING AT MY DESK NOW.
Louisville, Kentucky
sfrazer
246 days ago
God damnit, Randal.
deezil
246 days ago
For those that don't know the whole story: Approximately 7 years ago (imagine that) Randall posted this on the blog https://blog.xkcd.com/2010/11/05/submarines/ and made some vague references to tough times in the comics. On in to 2011, he posted this on the blog, and things seemed to be scary but hopeful. https://blog.xkcd.com/2011/06/30/family-illness/ . He's made mention several times about it over the years inside the comics, and I really believe that "Time" was made for some express purpose as to get his emotions out. But this update seriously is making a grown 32 year old man weep openly at his desk (thankfully I have a door that closes), as I always wondered how things were. Things look good, and this makes my heart happy.
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